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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Lee: We were unable to speak about this publicly because we have secret procedures being under taken pursuant to secret law. It has been a bit of a problem. What would you say -- getting back to you –Mr. Cole to my constituents. I understand what you are saying that we are collecting it but we’re not looking at it. We're closing our eyes. So don’t worry about it. What do you say to my constituents would say, i don’t want the government having this information.
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Lee continued: It’s not the government’s information. It still doesn’t make it relevant under the law. It still doesn’t meet what many of my constituents believe to be within their reasonable expectation of privacy. For the government to collect that much information, potentially information of 300 million Americans. Cole: i would say two things. First of all we have had 34 separate times
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Lee: thank you. I see my time has expired. i appreciate your insight. I do think it is worth discussing publicly. We need to consider from a constitutional standpoint. We have been relying on a 34 year-old supreme court case, Smith VS. Maryland, to get at this idea that metadata is somehow beyond the reach of the fourth amendment. But we have to remember that Smith did not involve collection on hundreds of millions of Americans. Involved collection on a single
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Lee continued 1A : target. It involved collection in a manner that is completely archaic by today’s standards and that by today’s standards would involve a miniscule amount of information. I think at some point when you collect this much data on that many people, whether it’s that much data on one person. That might create some problem. That much data on hundreds of millions of people creates an even bigger problem and not considered by the Supreme court of the United States in Maryland VS. Smith. And one we need to revisit.
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Whitehouse: I hope the executive branch takes a lesson from this experience about the value of classification, or what i would consider over classification. I've seen this over and over. When we were fighting with the Bush administration about the torture program, the executive branch got to tell its side of the story because
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN2 11/18/2014
Lee: The data collection at issue was not limited to those who were actually suspected of terrorist activity, or even necessarily to those who were connected to those suspended of engaging in terrorist activity. Many were, understandably, very concerned about how much and what kind of data was being collected and whether or not this information could be or had been abused by government officials. To date, proponents of the metadata program claim that it cannot be used to identify ordinary American citizens. But earlier this year researchers at Stanford University proved that the very time of meta data collected under section 215 of the Patriot Act could be used to uncover a lot of information, including information about a persons's politics, about what kind of medication they might be taking, about where they go to church, and so on and so forth.
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN2 11/18/2014
Lee: This U.S.A. Freedom Act is a bipartisan piece of legislation that would end bulk data collection of the metadata currently gathered by N.S.A. And it would help address the problem of the American government spying on its own citizens without cause. It also would improve transparency for the data that N.S.A. does collect. It has the support of leaders in our intelligence community, the department of justice, civil liberties groups, the national rifle association, and a whole bunch of tech companies. Opponents say it will impair our national security. They say this bill will keep our intelligence community from protecting us. But what opponents of this bill fail fully to appreciate is that most Americans are deeply, deeply concerned about the collection of their own personal information.
Mike Lee
U.S. Senator, R-Utah
CSPAN2 11/18/2014
Lee: This bill is an opportunity to strike a reasonable commonsense balance between protecting Americans' privacy and, at the same time, protecting our national security. Well, I believe that there are honest, decent people working in our intelligence community, and well, I think this is the norm, the overwhelming norm. I think it's always important to heed a warning given to us centuries ago by James Madison. In Federalist 51 James Madison wrote
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